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Thread: A refreshing spin on a the next phase of baseball negotiations

      
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    Default A refreshing spin on a the next phase of baseball negotiations

    By FanHouse Newswire

    Kenny WilliamsGLENDALE, Ariz. (AP) -- Chicago White Sox general manager Kenny Williams says talk of $30 million-a-year players is "asinine'' and he would support a work stoppage to bring fiscal sanity.

    Williams doesn't want a stoppage but said the sport's future needs to be protected for fans and smaller markets.

    In an earlier interview with Comcast SportsNet, Williams said discussion of a $30 million average salary was "asinine.'' He said baseball has reached the point of no return and something needs to happen.

    With St. Louis Cardinals slugger Albert Pujols eligible for free agency after the World Series, there has been speculation he could be the first with a $30 million average salary. Williams said Tuesday his comments were not personally directed at Pujols.

    "I said what I said. I said what I felt,'' Williams said as he sat in his golf cart watching his team's first full-squad workout.

    His comment about a shutdown drew attention.

    "Do I want that? Who does? Come on. Come on. This is a game where millions upon millions of people watch on television and come to the ballpark to get away from some of the things that are going on in life, to have a little bit of entertainment,'' Williams said. "That's all I'm saying. That's exactly what I'm saying, is that we have to protect that. We are stewards of the game and we have to protect it.''

    In his interview with Comcast, Williams said: "For the game's health as a whole, when we're talking about $30 million players, I think it's asinine.''

    "We have gotten to the point of no return. Something has to happen. And if it means the game being shut down for the sake of bringing sanity to it, to franchises that aren't going to stop the insanity, I'm all for it. ... You're not going to get any disagreement from me or argument from me if the game is shut down for a while until something is put in place where there is some sort of (salary) cap on the board.''

    While discussing his reasoning, Williams mentioned championship teams from Oakland, Cincinnati and Pittsburgh in the '70s and Kansas City in the '80s as small markets that helped popularize baseball.

    "I think it's important that the people and the cities that I just mentioned and many more have just as much chance to hope and dream about their team winning a World Series as anybody else,'' he said. "Right now that's not happening.''

    Asked about a White Sox payroll that could exceed $125 million this season, Williams said the White Sox might operate at a loss this year. Chicago signed Adam Dunn to a $56 million, four-year contract and brought Paul Konerko back for three years at $37.5 million.

    "Hell no, I'm not comfortable with the payroll right now. We're out on a limb. But that's our choice,'' he said. "We made the choice in an effort to give our fans hope and give ourselves a chance to compete for a championship. If things don't fall our way, if we don't get the support, we'll lose money.''

    Despite working in a top baseball market, Williams supported baseball’s smaller cities in his answers to Comcast SportsNet about the Pujols contract negotiations. “The teams in Pittsburgh and Kansas City, the smaller market teams, deserve just as much of an opportunity as the White Sox [and] the Cubs…the Yankees, Boston” he said. “There’s just too much of a disparity.”

    Williams reiterated that baseball become popular in the 1970′s and 80′s by successes of small market teams such as the Cincinnati Reds, Pittsburgh Pirates and Kansas City Royals. “I think it’s important that the people and the cities that I just mentioned and many more have just as much chance to hope and dream about their team winning a World Series as anybody else,” Williams said. “Right now that’s not happening.”

    From a Baltimore perspective, the Orioles rank anywhere from the low to mid twenties in television markets, making them a small market team in baseball. According to Williams, in order for Baltimore and other small markets to compete, the game may have to be “shut down.”

    “You’re not going to get any disagreement from me or argument from me if the game is shut down for a while until something is put in place where there is some sort of cap on the board,” he said.
    Refreshing to see this coming from an owner. It's been argued here that Pirate management has said that the salary will go up and when we get more competitive, the attendance will go up and that will help pay for the salary increases. (paraphrased of course.)

    I don't buy it, only because there isn't a great enough increase in attendance that will get us to even $75 -$100 million in salary. Williams is being the realist here. It is the competitiveness of ALL the teams that makes the game work. Until there is some sort of agreement in place to bring some sanity back, the game of baseball will continue to suffer.

    This isn't about Bob Nutting or Frank Coonelly not spending money in boatloads. It's about small market teams and how they need help playing on the same field as the big market teams.

    POLITICIANS AND DIAPERS SHOULD BE CHANGED OFTEN AND FOR THE SAME REASON!

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    Default Re: A refreshing spin on a the next phase of baseball negotiations

    "Do I want that? Who does? Come on. Come on. This is a game where millions upon millions of people watch on television and come to the ballpark to get away from some of the things that are going on in life, to have a little bit of entertainment,'' Williams said. "That's all I'm saying. That's exactly what I'm saying, is that we have to protect that. We are stewards of the game and we have to protect it.''


    Williams reiterated that baseball become popular in the 1970′s and 80′s by successes of small market teams such as the Cincinnati Reds, Pittsburgh Pirates and Kansas City Royals. “I think it’s important that the people and the cities that I just mentioned and many more have just as much chance to hope and dream about their team winning a World Series as anybody else,” Williams said. “Right now that’s not happening.”
    These are two of the most intelligent statements I've heard come out of a baseball executives mouth in maybe ever.
    Are these morons getting dumber or just louder-Mayor Quimby

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    Default Re: A refreshing spin on a the next phase of baseball negotiations

    Somewhere and I've been trying to find (no luck, I think it's in a blurb) coonelly made a couple of comments this past week about the CBA. Trying to find it. If anyone else knows where it's at, please copy and paste. Save me from looking
    The Standard Is The Standard and The Pittsburgh Sports Forum Is The Standard


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