Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Is a worldwide draft inevitable?

      
  1. #1
    indybucfan's Avatar
    Status : indybucfan is offline
    Rank : Major Leaguer
    Join Date : Oct 16, 2009
    Posts : 1,226
    Threads : 45
    Last Online : Feb-11-2015 @ 07:42 AM
    Sports Logo Sports Logo Sports Logo Sports Logo Sports Logo Sports Logo

    Default Is a worldwide draft inevitable?

    http://insider.espn.go.com/espn/blog...od_mlb_xxx_xxx

    An international draft primer

    Friday, December 4, 2009 | Print Entry


    Posted by Jorge Arangure Jr.

    This week during a conference call with reporters, new Major League Baseball Players Association executive director Michael Weiner indicated that the players won't likely oppose an implementation of a worldwide draft during negotiations for the next collective bargaining agreement.



    "There was plenty of sentiment for saying that players from Texas should be subject to the same rules as players from the Dominican Republic," Weiner told reporters.



    Owners have long been in favor of a worldwide draft, so Weiner's revelation makes it increasingly likely that we will see some variation of it when the new agreement starts in 2012. Coming up with a viable format for a worldwide draft won't be easy. The two sides won't only have to appease each other's concerns, but they'll also have to appease each country whose players would be eligible to be drafted.




    Though Lou Melendez, vice president of MLB's international operations, did not respond to a request for comment, it would be surprsing if MLB officials have not already begun to sort through the details. In conversations this year with La Esquina, many have spoken about the worldwide draft as if it were an inevitability.



    Although the issues are complicated, La Esquina will try to provide a basic primer on some of the more obvious questions surrounding a worldwide draft.

    What is it?


    Currently, baseball's amateur draft includes only players from the United States, Canada and Puerto Rico. Players from all other countries are considered free agents once they turn 16. A worldwide draft would lump all eligible players from every country into one draft. For example, this year, Cuban left-handed phenom Aroldis Chapman would have been subject to the same draft as former San Diego State star Stephen Strasburg. Eligibility would likely be determined by age.



    Why do we need it?

    Owners have long argued for a worldwide draft because of the escalating bonuses being given to international free agents. This year, Strasburg was generally considered the best amateur player on the planet, yet it's likely that Chapman will be given a higher bonus amount simply because he's a free agent who is able to negotiate with every team. In a sense, Strasburg is penalized for being an American-born player subject to the draft rules. A worldwide draft would level the playing field. If such a draft had been implemented this year, then it's likely Chapman would have been selected after Strasburg and as a result would have been given a lower bonus.

    Why would the players agree to it?


    Simply put, players who are subject to the draft aren't represented by the union. Players have to be on a team's 40-man roster in order to be part of the MLBPA. Of course, the possibility that Chapman could earn $30-$40 million affects an established superstars, such as free agent pitcher John Lackey (in his case it probably helps). Yet more realistically, the current economic environment has shown there simply isn't enough money for everyone. The $30-$40 million Chapman could earn might make it more difficult for veteran players (aka union members) to earn long-term or lucrative contracts. The $3.15 million given by the Twins to 16-year-old Dominican shortstop Miguel Angel Sano might make the team less likely to sign a veteran backup player.



    What are the biggest obstacles?


    Just because the two sides are in agreement about the need for a worldwide draft doesn't mean it will actually happen. Perhaps the trickiest part will be to convince participating countries to cooperate. In a sense, baseball is asking countries to limit the earning potential of some of its highest-earning citizens. For example, this year, 16-year-old Nicaraguan outfielder Cheslor Cuthbert received a $1.35 million bonus from the Kansas City Royals. If Cuthbert -- considered a toolsy but raw prospect -- had been subject to the draft, then he would have likely earned considerably less since he would have likely been slotted below many U.S.-born players. With a smaller bonus, Cuthbert won't contribute as much to his country's economy. And that says nothing of Cuthbert's labor rights in his own country; by submitting to an international draft his country would be agreeing to abolish his right to choose his employer.



    And what would happen if a country did not agree to such stipulations? Would it be possible that teams might not be allowed to draft players from a particular country? What would happen if the always-unpredictable Hugo Chavez does not adhere to MLB's rules? Would we never see Venezuelan players in the majors again? MLB's relationship with Venezuela is already tricky. Most teams have abandoned their Venezuelan academies because of the uncertain relationship between Chavez and the U.S. government.

    What other obstacles exist?


    Many baseball people argue that an infrastructure doesn't exist for international players to be evaluated in comparison to their American counterparts. While teams can scout high school games, most Latin American players don't participate in organized leagues.



    Also, the eligibility age must change. There was already sentiment in the MLB front office to raise the signing age to 17. This will become a necessity in a worldwide draft since it won't be fair for 16-year-old international players to be compared to 18-21 year old American or Canadian players. Also, will international players be subjected at least twice to the draft as American and Canadian players are? If an American player does not sign after being drafted in high school, he is eligible to be drafted again after spending time in college. Yet many players in Latin America don't attend college, so would they be subject to the draft each year? Or perhaps at age 17 and then again at age 20, for example?



    Who stands to benefit?


    Clearly, MLB teams have the most to gain. With a worldwide draft, bonus amounts are likely to decrease.



    But an unlikely winner may be older Latin American prospects. For years, late-blooming Latin American players older than 16 have been penalized when it came to bonuses. For some reason, teams simply weren't as interested in Latin American prospects if they were 18 or older. Many of these players were seen as washed up or not as good as their younger counterparts.



    Yet here is how a late-bloomer may benefit: Let's say a player from the Dominican Republic turns 17 and goes undrafted in a worldwide draft. Depending on the draft rules, that player -- who a year or more later may be more physically developed and in turn is a better prospect -- may have been granted free agency since he was undrafted. Now, as a better prospect, he may negotiate with any team and sign for a higher bonus than he would have received while under draft rules.



    Who stands to lose?


    The international players themselves are the most obvious losers since they stand to lose a considerable amount of money.



    Also, trainers in Latin America (called buscones by some) stand to take a hit. While some MLB teams consider trainers a necessary evil of doing business in Latin America, many of these men provide invaluable training to prospects who otherwise would get no instruction. Of course the relationship is mutually beneficial -- excluding players -- since trainers receive a substantial amount (usually 30 percent) of a player's signing bonus. Eliminating high bonuses might hurt the training business and, as a result, negatively impact baseball instruction in a particular country.



    For example, the Dominican Republic does not have a strong national baseball program. Despite having a high percentage of major league players, the Dominican has not been a contendor in international competition. Most players are taught to play by buscones. If buscones have less incentive to train players -- since they would be earning considerably less under a worldwide draft -- then that could affect the quality of baseball in the Dominican Republic.



    What are the possible loopholes?


    Trainers are a resourceful bunch, so MLB will have to be on constant alert and must be willing to alter rules accordingly. One possible glitch would be the possibility that trainers would hide players in order for them to go undrafted. That way, players could then become free agents. Since little infrastructure exists in some countries, many players wouldn't participate in high school or college tournaments, meaning they would simply showcase themselves through workouts. But a trainer could choose for his player not to workout for teams. If the player then goes undrafted, then subsequently becomes a free agent, the trainer could negotiate with every team for a higher bonus.



    This is only a start to the disccusion, look for things to get much more heated as the MLBPA and team owners pursue the issue.

  2. #2
    wvkeeper's Avatar
    Status : wvkeeper is offline
    Rank : Major Leaguer
    Join Date : Oct 17, 2009
    Location : Right There
    Posts : 1,367
    Threads : 158
    Last Online : Nov-03-2016 @ 07:14 AM
    Sports Logo Sports Logo Sports Logo Sports Logo Sports Logo Sports Logo

    Default Re: Is a worldwide draft inevitable?

    Will not happen well because of the wild west of Latin America.

  3. #3
    indybucfan's Avatar
    Status : indybucfan is offline
    Rank : Major Leaguer
    Join Date : Oct 16, 2009
    Posts : 1,226
    Threads : 45
    Last Online : Feb-11-2015 @ 07:42 AM
    Sports Logo Sports Logo Sports Logo Sports Logo Sports Logo Sports Logo

    Default Re: Is a worldwide draft inevitable?

    connect the players to a work visa and it can happen. State clearly in the rules, that you have to have a work visa by such and such date before the draft or you don't get in the draft. If you don't get in the draft, you wait till next year, plain and simple. No free agency till after your 18th birthday.

  4. #4
    Kipper's Avatar
    Status : Kipper is offline
    Rank : Legend
    Join Date : Oct 8, 2009
    Posts : 67,323
    Threads : 1817
    Last Online : Apr-25-2017 @ 08:36 PM
    Sports Logo Sports Logo Sports Logo Sports Logo Sports Logo Sports Logo

    Default Re: Is a worldwide draft inevitable?

    The NHL and the NBA do it, so can the MLB. What the MLB needs toi start doing however is stop allowing agents, unions etc... make their ****ing decisions. Simple straight up tell these countries... You want to [play in the MLB... then you're entering the draft. You won't be getting the ridiculous bonuses as you once did and if you don't like that... stay in your 3rd world country. If the leaders of that country don't like it, then **** them. We've got enough talent in the US and other countries to form a fine draft

  5. #5
    wvkeeper's Avatar
    Status : wvkeeper is offline
    Rank : Major Leaguer
    Join Date : Oct 17, 2009
    Location : Right There
    Posts : 1,367
    Threads : 158
    Last Online : Nov-03-2016 @ 07:14 AM
    Sports Logo Sports Logo Sports Logo Sports Logo Sports Logo Sports Logo

    Default Re: Is a worldwide draft inevitable?

    I think Eastern Europe, Scandinavia, and Russia are far more legit in the process than any of the Latin American countries. I think people are underrating how crooked and poorly run those countries are as a whole.

  6. #6
    Kipper's Avatar
    Status : Kipper is offline
    Rank : Legend
    Join Date : Oct 8, 2009
    Posts : 67,323
    Threads : 1817
    Last Online : Apr-25-2017 @ 08:36 PM
    Sports Logo Sports Logo Sports Logo Sports Logo Sports Logo Sports Logo

    Default Re: Is a worldwide draft inevitable?

    Quote Originally Posted by wvkeeper View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    I think Eastern Europe, Scandinavia, and Russia are far more legit in the process than any of the Latin American countries. I think people are underrating how crooked and poorly run those countries are as a whole.
    I dunno. russia is pretty ****ed up if you followed the entire Malkin ordeal

    the international draft is ****ed up right now because MLB has allowed to be that way by ignoring it and at best placing useless band aids on it. The longer you ignore something that's not working correctly... the worse it's going to get.

    MLB needs to simply say "you want to play in the MLB then you are going to be part of the same draft as everyone else. If you have a problem with that then enjoy being dirt poor". Latin America IMO needs MLB more than the MLB needs Latin America. we've got more than enough talent in the US to supplement drafts and teams if need be. It's time for MLB to actually dictate how this is going to be instead of pulling this diplomatic bull**** which in the end leaves MLB with a sore ******* and red marks on their cheeks.

Quick Reply Quick Reply

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •