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Thread: Officials need to quit protecting

      
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    Default Officials need to quit protecting

    Officials need to quit protecting
    November 22, 2010
    By: HERALD STANDARD STAFF
    Herald Standard

    PITTSBURGH - Memo to NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell: If you want your officials to protect the players, send them all back here next Saturday.

    Four high school district championships will be decided that day at Heinz Field and maybe these kids need protected.

    The guys playing on Sundays don't.

    Sorry, but it is that plain and simple.

    Twenty-one penalties were enforced Sunday in Pittsburgh's 35-3 win over the Oakland Raiders. Some of them, possibly most of them, were justified.

    The officiating crew here Sunday, led by Tony Corrente, had a tough game to call, that's for sure. To call Sunday's game "chippy" wouldn't do it justice.

    But the crew forced Corrente to utter words that referees shouldn't be forced to utter under any circumstances.

    On a pass interference penalty against Ike Taylor late in the second quarter, Corrente turned on his microphone and announced that Taylor had blocked Louis Murphy's path to the football.

    Back in the day when you oversaw a tough game played by men, this was called "good coverage." Now, with all of your new rules supposedly geared toward player safety, it's 15 yards against the guy who did his job. If Taylor had actually impeded Murphy's progress, isn't it up to Murphy to run through Taylor and at least make an effort to catch the ball?

    Enough about that one, though. Believe me, there's more, plenty more.

    Ryan Clark was called for a helmet-to-helmet hit, which is against a new edict. However, it's not against the most basic of tackling techniques. Coaches all over the country teach their players to "put a hat on him." The way you want the game played, you had better do what Jack Lambert once suggested and "put a dress on him."

    You've probably figured out that I'm saving the best for last.

    I'd like you to explain what more James Harrison could have done not to rough Raiders quarterback Jason Campbell on Taylor's fourth-quarter pick six.

    Not just to me, either. Harrison doesn't know what he did wrong and he was the one you called in for an explanation conference a few weeks ago.

    "I did all I could do," Harrison said. "I put my arms out so that I wouldn't come down on top of him. The ref looked, waited a few seconds and decided otherwise. I am playing within the rules of the game."

    Suffice to say, the officials are not protecting the players. Neither you nor your officials can legislate health. Please quit trying.

    Sports editor Mike Ciarochi may be reached at mciarochi@heraldstandard.com.

    http://www.heraldstandard.com/news_d...tecting-b.html
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    Default Re: Officials need to quit protecting

    Flags a-flying at Heinz
    By: Andrew Chiappazzi
    Beaver County Times
    Sunday November 21, 2010

    PITTSBURGH — The yellow hankies flew at a record rate on Sunday, and it wasn’t just because the Raiders and Steelers appeared to slip back into their 1970s style hatred of each other.

    Twenty-one total penalties were called, including 14 on the rarely flagged Steelers. Pittsburgh entered the day averaging just over five infractions per game, but was flagged for a team record 163 yards.

    “I’ll tell you that the game got away from us, both teams. It’s unfortunate, but I’m not going to let that dominate our thought,” coach Mike Tomlin said. “I’m not going to question the officiating. I understand the climate that we’re in from that standpoint.”

    The climate Tomlin’s referring to is an NFL that’s on its guard for any potential shots to the head. Safety Ryan Clark was flagged for a helmet-to-helmet hit — he actually hit Raiders receiver Jacoby Ford in the back — but said he understands the mentality of the officials.

    “Right now it’s a game where the referees kind of have to be on edge and make the call first, then review it later,” Clark said. “I understand that. We have to keep playing hard and keep trying to do our jobs legally and to the best of our abilities.”

    Lamar Woodley’s roughing the passer penalty in the first quarter started the flagfest, but Woodley said that no matter the calls — nor the amount of them — the Steelers can’t let it bother them.

    “If you start letting penalties affect the way we play,” he said, “we’re not going to be the aggressive team that we’ve always been.”

    http://www.timesonline.com/sports/sp...-at-heinz.html
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    Default Re: Officials need to quit protecting

    11/22/2010
    Penalties cast shadow over victory

    PITTSBURGH - It was a bad day to play for the Oakland Raiders at Heinz Field.

    Coming off a 39-26 whipping by the New England Patriots last weekend, the Steelers were an angry football team Sunday.

    How angry?

    Angry enough to hold the Raiders - who had averaged more than 450 yards total offense in their previous three games - to only 182.

    Angry enough to roll up 431 yards with an offense that literally went toe-to-toe with the Raiders on several occasions.

    Angry enough to draw 14 penalties for a team-record 163 yards.

    OK, that last one was probably a little too angry, but that was the state the Steelers were in.

    "After last week's game, we came in here and knew we had to make a statement, and that's what we did," said rookie center Maurkice Pouncey.

    It might not have been the kind of statement they wanted to make. Yes, the result - a 35-3 whipping of the Raiders - was what the Steelers desired. But the penalties, particularly on offense, were the kind that will get you beaten by a good team, which the Raiders obviously are not despite entering the game with a 5-4 record.

    The Steelers were highly charged after last week's whipping. They wanted to prove they're still a contender in the AFC. They wanted to show they weren't going to go into a nose dive after a 6-2 start - as they did in 2009.

    While emotion is certainly a good thing to play with, you can't get emotional to the point you lose your composure.

    "That game got away from us - both teams," Steelers coach Mike Tomlin said. "It was unfortunate, but I'm not going to let that dominate our thought.

    "It was a shame."

    The penalties and post-play pushing and shoving from both sides marred what was otherwise an outstanding performance by the Steelers.

    After not recording a sack or turnover in the loss to the Patriots, the Steelers took Oakland quarterbacks down six times and had three takeaways.

    The run defense, which gave up more than 100 yards to the Patriots - the first time an oppoonent has topped 100 this season - limited Oakland's Darren McFadden to 14 yards on 10 carries. McFadden entered the game averaging 108.1 per game, the best in the NFL.

    Quarterback Ben Roethlisberger was efficient, completing passes to eight different receivers and throwing for 275 yards and three scores.

    And the running game and special teams were solid, if unspectacular.

    The play after the whistles, however, was old-school Steelers-Raiders stuff from the 1970s.

    "They came out trying to force their toughness on us," said Oakland defensive lineman Tommy Kelly.

    There were pushing and shoving matches. There were shots delivered to anyone near a pile or tackle. There was even an ejection to Oakland defensive lineman Richard Seymour for punching Roethlisberger in the facemask after a second-quarter touchdown pass.

    "We knew it had to be physical, with us coming off a loss last week. We knew we had to get after it," said guard Chris Kemoeatu, who got into two fights with Seymour prior to the ejection. "We knew we had to do whatever it took to win this game. We knew it was going to get physical. A lot of people exchanged words, hits, blows, after-the-whistle stuff."

    The Steelers wanted to be the bullies instead of the guys giving up their lunch money.

    "It was better us pushing them," Pouncey said.

    Mission accomplished.

    But the Steelers understand crossing the line with the penalties - though some were questionable - is not something they can continue.

    "It's embarrassing," linebacker LaMarr Woodley said. "It's something we're going to have to cut out if we're going to continue to win football games."

    F. Dale Lolley can be reached at dlolley@observer-reporter.com

    http://www.observer-reporter.com/or/...teelers-column
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    Default Re: Officials need to quit protecting

    That crew needs investigated.

    That **** was pathetic.

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